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Legal Studio offers practical advice, great value for money and a personal service for businesses like yours.
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Legal Studio tailors advice to your personal legal issue.
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If you need legal representation, we can help.

We specialise in many legal areas, including:
  • Professional Negligence;
  • Cohabitation claims;
  • Criminal investigations;
  • White collar crime.


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If your business needs legal representation, support or advice, we can help.

The areas in which we specialise include, but are not limited to:
  • Dispute resolution;
  • Contracts and commercial;
  • Regulatory;
  • Commercial property.


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OUR LATEST NEWS

A recent poll commissioned to mark Cohabitation Awareness week revealed that out of 2,000 adults, 37% wrongly believed that unmarried couples can obtain a ‘common law marriage’ and 27% wrongly believed that if they separated they would have the same rights as a married couple. Whilst it might be seen as unromantic, this blog helps to clarify 4 myths about cohabitation so you can understand your rights as a cohabiting couple better and get back to enjoying your day!
 

Myth 1: Because you have lived together for so long, you are treated as husband and wife

WRONG 

A common law marriage does not exist in any form. Regardless of the duration of the relationship, the laws applied to cohabiting couples are completely different to those applied to married couples.
 

Myth 2: If we split up, the main carer of children will get the cohabited home

WRONG

This should not be assumed. Although a court considers the needs of the children, the main carer may not be able to keep the shared home. Once a child reaches the age of 18 years old, their needs are no longer prioritised and the house will usually be sold in order for the other parent to retain their rights in the house.

 
Myth 3: Cohabitation agreements are of no assistance

WRONG

A cohabitation agreement allows both parties’ promises to be recorded in a written agreement. This helps you to know the rights that you and your partner have, and allows the court to know what the parties intended.
 

Myth 4: The court will consider a fair outcome

WRONG

Because you are not married, the question is: “who legally owns the assets in dispute?”. The argument of fairness is not of any huge influence. Factors that do come into consideration are whether there was a common intention to share the property and there had been an express conversation stating this, or, whether the property is held jointly in proportion to the amount paid.
 
Whilst we sincerely hope that you never need to get into this kind of situation (and not on today of all days!), if you do want a free, confidential discussion regarding a co-habitation dispute, take a look at our Cohabitation Dispute page on our website, or get in touch with Matthew Dowell.
 
2018 30 14
Matthew Dowell
Yes, ‘Don’t cry over spilled milk day’ is an actual day, and it’s today! So, in the midst of legal proceedings, issues, claims and disputes, we therefore encourage you to think of the positives and stay optimistic as a litigant in person or for your legal representatives.
 
It may be hard to do so, due to the financial difficulty, time pressures, nerves and ambiguity that may surround your legal situation, but think of the benefits of your situation.
 
The Jackson civil litigation reforms only assisted these benefits that you are experiencing.
 

These included:

  • An extension of the range of funding mechanisms that are available to parties such as damaged based agreements, third party funding and legal aid funds;
  • Banning referral fees in personal injury cases;
  • Fixed costs in the fast track;
  • Controlling disclosure and e-disclosure more effectively so that costs are proportionate to the issues in dispute;
  • Part 36 offers; and
  • The promotion of ADR and out of court settlement.
 
These make your legal experience less time consuming, less expensive and can even help preserve the relationship between parties.
 
It may not be plain sailing in law for everyone, but we learn from mistakes. The legal proceedings will end at some point. The whole process and final judgement will help you understand how to avoid disputes and proceedings in the future or deal with them in an efficient way.
 
It could be worse, you could have finalised your dispute before the reforms.
 
After all, the glass is still half full (of milk).
 
2018 00 11
Kate Imeson
The Winter Olympics Games are being held in PyeongChang in South Korea this year. Although a fun event, sporting ‘irregularities’ have become a much bigger issue in recent times. So, if you’d like to know more about how the Winter Olympics are regulated, have a read of this blog to see the rules that must be complied with.
 
There are 3 primary enforcement codes and conventions that implement the rules for the Winter Olympic Games. These are:
 
  1. Olympic movement Code on the Prevention of the Manipulation of Competitions
 
This Code aims to provide sports organisations with harmonised regulations to protect all competitions from the risk of manipulation. Appropriate measures must be taken to comply with the Code by all National and International Olympic Committees, International Federations, their respective members and also IOC recognised organisations.
 
More information is available here.
 
  1. IOC Code of Ethics
 
The Code prevents participants of the Olympics from betting on the events and report any suspicious activity of manipulation, corruption and cheating. Each Olympic Games has its own edition of the Code. There is a strict review and disciplinary procedure for non-compliance.
 
The 2018 Code of Ethics can be found here.
 
  1. Council of Europe Convention on the Manipulation of Competitions
 
This is a specific international convention on competition manipulation, signed by states around the world. It aims to prevent, detect, punish and discipline the manipulation of sports competitions including the Winter Olympic Games, alongside enhancing international cooperation with sports organisations.
 
More information can be found here.
 
2018 30 06
Kate Imeson