Curabitur aliquet quam id dui posuere blandit. Praesent sapien massa, convallis a pellentesque nec, egestas non nisi. Donec rutrum congue leo eget malesuada. Proin eget tortor risus.

Donec rutrum congue leo eget malesuada. Donec rutrum congue leo eget malesuada. Donec sollicitudin molestie malesuada. Curabitur arcu erat, accumsan id imperdiet et, porttitor at sem. Quisque velit nisi, pretium ut lacinia in, elementum id enim. Proin eget tortor risus. Pellentesque in ipsum id orci porta dapibus. Cras ultricies ligula sed magna dictum porta.

Mauris blandit aliquet elit, eget tincidunt nibh pulvinar a. Vestibulum ac diam sit amet quam vehicula elementum sed sit amet dui.


Early objective advice on recovering your money is essential.

At Legal Studio we take the time to understand you and your business so we can provide you with expert, practical advice on your case. We don’t do bulk, generic or one size fits all responses.

We also understand the need for cost effectiveness, Whether it’s the method of recovery pursued or an early frank conversation regarding fees; we’re happy to talk.

Get in touch now to discuss your options and a commercial solution to your problems.

Key Lorem Ipsum

Quisque velit nisi, pretium ut lacinia in, elementum id enim. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Donec velit neque, auctor sit amet aliquam vel, ullamcorper sit amet ligula.

Filter By


Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Donec velit neque, auctor sit amet aliquam vel, ullamcorper sit amet ligula.

A boundary dispute often includes two parties fighting over a small strip of land, where neither party changes its standpoint and legal costs quickly increase due to their unwillingness to use ADR. When establishing a boundary, complex questions arise such as:

  • Is the boundary marked by a physical feature?
  • Is the boundary defined in legal documents?
  • Is the physical boundary followed exactly the same as the legal boundary?
  • Is there an agreement between the owners, a statute or legal presumption that defines the boundary?

These disputes can be notoriously complex and the final outcome can be uncertain. But there must be some other way to resolve this efficiently.

Now, there is.

A new Boundary Disputes Protocol has been created by the Property Litigation Association. The Protocol applies to both commercial and residential property within England and Wales and assumes that informal discussions have failed, and a more structured resolution is required. It is a FREE resource online for parties alongside relevant guidance.

What does the Protocol do?

There are a number of time limits and processes that the Protocol implements for parties in order to exchange information and resolve the dispute efficiently and consensually. Failure to comply with the Protocol could result in costs being awarded at court against the non-complying party.

What does the Protocol say?

1. When a dispute arises, neither party should interfere with the boundary or the disputed land, until the dispute is resolved.

2. Neither party should do anything which may impair the relationship between the parties or increase costs unnecessarily.

3. Both parties should agree to use the Boundary Dispute Protocol.

4. The First Conveyance should be interpreted to determine the location of the boundary. The words used, and the physical features referred to on the First Conveyance can assist the dispute. In some circumstances, subsequent conduct and services could be relevant.

5. Each party must consider the evidence that they can use. They must exchange documentary evidence they have, identify proposed witnesses and what they will say.

6. When appropriate, a joint expert should be instructed. If separate experts are justified, the experts need to write reports, meet up, identify the issues in dispute and set a strict timetable.

7. There should be an on-site meeting with the parties in dispute and any surveyors that have been instructed. An agreement on what the issues are needs to be made.

8. Any agreement reached must be set out in a written document and state clearly what has been agreed or what is required. It may refer to physical features on the ground. This will prevent future disputes. For certainty, it is wise to ask a lawyer to draw up this agreement.

9. Each party should apply to the Land Registry to note the agreement against their titles.

Following this Protocol will help you solve a dispute earlier, avoid unnecessary costs and can preserve a relationship between neighbours. We therefore suggest that you seriously consider the Protocol before pursuing litigation.

The easy to read Protocol can be found here

2018 08 22
Phil Copley
Any individual living in the current technological age may have had some doubts about the protection of their personal data. When personal data is given over for social media accounts, automatic online sign-ins, employment contracts, legal claims, health records and other reasons so freely, it is understandable why these doubts arise.

The doubts are only provoked by seeing advertisements that relate so closely to search history patterns and the receiving of emails from businesses without giving explicit consent to them. Businesses process and control personal data on a daily basis for these reasons and only now have individuals been given further rights to protect them against this.
The new General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) has recognised the need for protection of personal data. It will apply from 25 May 2018 and makes sure that personal data flowing in, or from, the EU is protected under one harmonized law.
For any business processing data, or controlling data with businesses that process data, compliance is essential. There are new requirements under the GDPR that need to be followed. These include, but are not limited to:
  1. Ensuring that consent has been genuinely obtained for the processing. If consent is obtained from a child, parental consent must also be obtained. This must be freely given, obvious to the individual that it is the giving of consent, clearly separate from other information, a positive action and be in plain language. This means that the ticking of a box would be acceptable, but the unticking of a box would not be.
  1. Making sure that the whole business is educated and trained about the GDPR, carrying out impact assessments and documenting all processing activities that are carried out. Records of training and impact assessments must be kept as a Supervising Authority may ask a business to show proof of GDPR compliance.
  1. Allowing individuals extra rights after the processing. This includes:
    • A way to withdraw consent as easily as giving it;
    • A way to access personal data that a business has, in a readable format; and
    • A way to request that their data is completely deleted.
Information about how an individual may initiate these rights must be provided by a business such as within a privacy notice or at the time of giving consent.
And what if a business doesn’t comply? They can be fined over 20 million euros! For any business, this is huge sanction. Non-compliance is not an option when faced with this potential penalty.
2018 00 22
Matthew Dowell
A recent poll commissioned to mark Cohabitation Awareness week revealed that out of 2,000 adults, 37% wrongly believed that unmarried couples can obtain a ‘common law marriage’ and 27% wrongly believed that if they separated they would have the same rights as a married couple. Whilst it might be seen as unromantic, this blog helps to clarify 4 myths about cohabitation so you can understand your rights as a cohabiting couple better and get back to enjoying your day!

Myth 1: Because you have lived together for so long, you are treated as husband and wife


A common law marriage does not exist in any form. Regardless of the duration of the relationship, the laws applied to cohabiting couples are completely different to those applied to married couples.

Myth 2: If we split up, the main carer of children will get the cohabited home


This should not be assumed. Although a court considers the needs of the children, the main carer may not be able to keep the shared home. Once a child reaches the age of 18 years old, their needs are no longer prioritised and the house will usually be sold in order for the other parent to retain their rights in the house.

Myth 3: Cohabitation agreements are of no assistance


A cohabitation agreement allows both parties’ promises to be recorded in a written agreement. This helps you to know the rights that you and your partner have, and allows the court to know what the parties intended.

Myth 4: The court will consider a fair outcome


Because you are not married, the question is: “who legally owns the assets in dispute?”. The argument of fairness is not of any huge influence. Factors that do come into consideration are whether there was a common intention to share the property and there had been an express conversation stating this, or, whether the property is held jointly in proportion to the amount paid.
Whilst we sincerely hope that you never need to get into this kind of situation (and not on today of all days!), if you do want a free, confidential discussion regarding a co-habitation dispute, take a look at our Cohabitation Dispute page on our website, or get in touch with Matthew Dowell.
2018 30 14
Matthew Dowell
Yes, ‘Don’t cry over spilled milk day’ is an actual day, and it’s today! So, in the midst of legal proceedings, issues, claims and disputes, we therefore encourage you to think of the positives and stay optimistic as a litigant in person or for your legal representatives.
It may be hard to do so, due to the financial difficulty, time pressures, nerves and ambiguity that may surround your legal situation, but think of the benefits of your situation.
The Jackson civil litigation reforms only assisted these benefits that you are experiencing.

These included:

  • An extension of the range of funding mechanisms that are available to parties such as damaged based agreements, third party funding and legal aid funds;
  • Banning referral fees in personal injury cases;
  • Fixed costs in the fast track;
  • Controlling disclosure and e-disclosure more effectively so that costs are proportionate to the issues in dispute;
  • Part 36 offers; and
  • The promotion of ADR and out of court settlement.
These make your legal experience less time consuming, less expensive and can even help preserve the relationship between parties.
It may not be plain sailing in law for everyone, but we learn from mistakes. The legal proceedings will end at some point. The whole process and final judgement will help you understand how to avoid disputes and proceedings in the future or deal with them in an efficient way.
It could be worse, you could have finalised your dispute before the reforms.
After all, the glass is still half full (of milk).
2018 00 11
Kate Imeson
For the first year ever, Legal Studio will be one of the small number of law firms in Leeds to sponsor awards at Leeds Beckett University and the University of Leeds.
Academic excellence in the “Cyberlaw: Law and the Regulation of the Information Society” module on the LLB Law course at the University of Leeds and in the “Best Extended Study at L6 – Employment” module on the LPC course at Leeds Beckett University will be rewarded by Legal Studio.
This is only one way in which Legal Studio are actively getting involved with the student community of Leeds.
The Legal Studio stall can also be found at the Stay in Leeds Law Fair in the Liberty Building on Wednesday 21st February 2018 where we will be speaking with students and collecting CV’s for work experience placements during the summer.
Legal Studio will also be conducting mock interviews for law students at the University of Leeds who require interviewing experience and assistance during their applications for placements.
We wish good luck to those studying on the modules and look forward to meeting the students that take advantage of these opportunities.
2018 27 09
Kate Imeson
The Winter Olympics Games are being held in PyeongChang in South Korea this year. Although a fun event, sporting ‘irregularities’ have become a much bigger issue in recent times. So, if you’d like to know more about how the Winter Olympics are regulated, have a read of this blog to see the rules that must be complied with.
There are 3 primary enforcement codes and conventions that implement the rules for the Winter Olympic Games. These are:
  1. Olympic movement Code on the Prevention of the Manipulation of Competitions
This Code aims to provide sports organisations with harmonised regulations to protect all competitions from the risk of manipulation. Appropriate measures must be taken to comply with the Code by all National and International Olympic Committees, International Federations, their respective members and also IOC recognised organisations.
More information is available here.
  1. IOC Code of Ethics
The Code prevents participants of the Olympics from betting on the events and report any suspicious activity of manipulation, corruption and cheating. Each Olympic Games has its own edition of the Code. There is a strict review and disciplinary procedure for non-compliance.
The 2018 Code of Ethics can be found here.
  1. Council of Europe Convention on the Manipulation of Competitions
This is a specific international convention on competition manipulation, signed by states around the world. It aims to prevent, detect, punish and discipline the manipulation of sports competitions including the Winter Olympic Games, alongside enhancing international cooperation with sports organisations.
More information can be found here.
2018 30 06
Kate Imeson
Following a few months’ worth of planning, we are delighted to finally reveal our new website!

What’s changed?

There are many elements to the website that have changed. These include:

•    More user-friendly information about the services that we provide;
•    Updated, easy to access blog content;
•    A newsletter sign-up;
•    Updated photos;
•    An easier method to contact us; and
•    Much more!

For clients

You will now be able to search our ‘For You’ and ‘For Businesses’ sections easily to find out more on the services we provide. 

For each service, you can also see the consultant who deals with the service, what other people have said about them, as well as their contact details.

You have access to our FREE online resources, blogs and newsletter sign up, which provides you with easy to understand, up to date, legal information. 

For consultants

We have improved our Careers page so you can see what Legal Studio is really like, what a consultant at Legal Studio really does, the stories of our current consultants and the rewards you receive working with us.

What’s next?

However, our new website is only the beginning of the big changes coming to Legal Studio!

Keep up to date with our blogs or sign up to our newsletter so that you’re the first to know. 

Navigate through our new website NOW and see the changes for yourself.
2018 14 09
Kate Imeson
This week’s blog comes from Edmund Conybeare, on the three questions he gets asked over and over again…
As a self-employed defence lawyer, I get asked three questions:
  1. You are self-employed. Isn’t it tempting to just sit around all day watching daytime TV in your pyjamas?
  2. How do you defend people you know are guilty, or have done terrible things?
  3. What is your approach to clients?
The answers to these are linked but here goes:
Yes, my time is my own, subject to my commitments to Legal Studio, court hearings and client appointments.
But, if I don’t work I don’t earn any money, and with a wife and three growing girls to keep, such a course wouldn’t be very helpful.
However, it’s not just about the need to make money. I went into the law because I found it interesting, I wanted to make a difference, and I wanted to be the best for my clients. A lot of the time I actually enjoy what I do. I love helping my clients, many of whom find themselves in real difficulty, and hopefully winning their cases. Plus, being self-employed means that I am more flexible in the way I work and can better adapt to my clients’ needs.
This is the old dinner party chestnut, but is of real continuing interest to people I speak to.
If a client tells me they have committed the offence, I cannot then run a not guilty plea at trial, unless they think they have committed the offence, when in law, they haven’t, and I advise them of this.
For example, just because a client admits hitting someone, it doesn’t mean they are necessarily guilty of assault, they may have acted in self-defence. However, I am what is called an officer of the court, and cannot mislead it.
Even if I do not necessarily believe my client’s account, I am still free to pursue the defence they advance. At times, I have been sceptical but the evidence has shown my client to be entirely truthful. The court is the arbiter of truth, not me. A lot of the time I am dealing with cases where the offence is admitted and I am mitigating to obtain a lesser sentence.
Everyone is entitled to a defence. However serious the allegation, however unpleasant, however vilified by society a defendant may be, the rule of law demands that a person or company receive a proper defence.
Consequently, I always turn this question round: what if you were accused of something vile, like sexually assaulting a child, wouldn’t you expect no stone to be unturned in your defence, with the looming threat of prison, personal disgrace and lifetime pariah status? I never flinch from defending the unpleasant, indeed often the stakes are higher and my role becomes even more important.
Firstly, and it may seem trivial, but with a name like Conybeare which frequently gets mispronounced, I ensure I get my client’s name right. It really matters to me, and is a basic courtesy.
Secondly, I always put the person or company I am representing first, not what they are alleged to have done. I like and respect the vast majority of my clients and I want to establish rapport at an early stage.
Occasionally I don’t establish a good relationship and I have on one occasion told a client that we are not getting on and they should seek alternative representation. The client lawyer relationship in defence cases can become fraught and stressed and cannot start on a bad footing.
Finally, and this is the cornerstone of my ethos, I believe at the start that my clients are entirety innocent of whatever allegation they face. Sure, they may admit they have done it, or the evidence may be overwhelming, but innocence is always the starting point and I work from there. It means I am starting with the basic tenet of our criminal justice system, the presumption of innocence, and respects my client’s position.
The day I don’t start with innocence is the day I seek an alternative career. It follows from that basic foundation that I will pursue every avenue and line of defence I can within the rules of my profession and the resources I have at my disposal.
That is my guarantee to every client that walks through my door and instructs me. I am always humbled and honoured that a client believes in me to obtain the best result, and I aim to repay that faith in full.
2018 16 08
Edmund Conybeare
2017 has ended and a new year is upon us. However, you’re still stuck in the same legal job and don’t know what to do next.
Maybe you’re a solicitor who has been working at the same firm, without progression or recognition.
Maybe you’re bored of the targets set by your employer.
Maybe you’re looking for a flexible style of working, on your terms, not someone else’s.
Don’t let 2018 be as monotonous as 2017. Join Legal Studio as a self-employed solicitor.
What do you mean?
Well, Legal Studio is a team of self-employed consultants. Each individual has complete control over their work whilst still being able to surround themselves with the expertise and camaraderie of the wider firm. We offer truly flexible working and a far more personal service than any other firm and you are able to openly discuss costs with clients, free from the constraints of huge overheads.
We strip away the usual stress of a law firm and provide you with the support and guidance that you require. We actively encourage you to ensure that you give your clients the personal service they want, without the unnecessary targets. 
This can allow you to build a stronger relationship with your clients and get out what you put in.
But this sounds too good to be true…
And we agree. However, it isn’t. This new business model is becoming far more popular in today’s shifting legal sphere and you should join it. The opportunity is real, and Legal Studio can help you realise it.
We welcome applicants to join our team at any stage in the year.
Don’t let 2018 run away and waste another year in a job that you don’t like.
Please see our Careers page for more information about the role and the application process.
Still don’t believe us? Then why not get in touch with any of our team for a confidential discussion on turning this year into your year.
2018 11 08
Jodie Wildridge

With every year comes a whirlwind of new laws and regulations.
This blog sets out a few new laws and regulations that will come into force in 2018.
The UK Government intends to introduce further deterrents to prevent the employment of illegal workers within the UK.
What’s new?
  • An employer will be unable to claim the Government Employment Allowance for a period of one year if they have:
    • Hired an illegal worker
    • Been penalised for their actions by the Home Office
    • Exhausted appeal rights in relation to the imposed penalty
The Government intends on publishing a draft law which will require the registration of drones that fit certain criteria.
What’s new?
  • Drones over 250g will need to be registered;
  • Leisure pilots need to complete a pilot test;
  • Safety awareness tests are required to ensure a drone’s flight is safe and legal;
  • Police seizure powers of illegal drones; and
  • ‘No-fly zones’.
This is the biggest change in data protection rules in over two decades. It replaces the Data Protection Directive 1995. It will also survive Brexit. If you’re currently subject to the DPA, you will likely be subject to the GDPR.
What’s new?
  • Rights for individuals to access the information that companies hold about them;
  • Universal application to all controllers and processors of personal data;
  • An obligation for better data management of businesses;
  • Increased requirements for the appointment of a Data Protection Officer;
  • Increased consent requirements; and
  • Increased fines for non-compliance.
The full GDPR can be found at
This directive will harmonise the definition of trade secrets. It will put companies, investors, creators and researchers on an equal footing, however journalists will still be free to investigate and publish business affairs as they do today. If you’re in business, it will require a refresh of your contractual terms, policies and procedures.
What’s new?
  • Harmonised definition of trade secrets;
  • Reasonable steps to keep matters secrets;
  • Companies must follow legal obligations to disclose information of public interest;
  • Safeguards for those acting in public interest who disclose a trade secret to reveal illegal activity, misconduct or a wrongdoing; and
  • Secondary liability.
The full TSD can be found at
In the wacky world of housing and property, we have the following to get excited about:
  • The Government announced on 28 December that they would re-visit Houses of Multiple Occupancy, primarily widening mandatory licensing and introducing minimum room sizes.
  • At the same time, the Government also announced plans for a ‘rogue landlord’ database. The Greater London Authority already has one.
  • There are plans to review new-build leaseholds, namely scrapping ground rents (for both houses and flats) and preventing houses being leasehold.
  • The Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation and Liability for Housing Standards) Bill gets its second reading on 19 January 2018. This is an important Bill which aims to review existing legislation in order to set a minimum level of standard for residential accommodation.
  • The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property) (England and Wales) Regulations 2015 will soon come into effect. That means that from 1 April 2018, residential properties which are let (including any renewal) must have an Energy Performance Certificate rating of at least E. There will be some minimum exemptions.
  • The Land Registry intends to keep data on their top 500 customers, and share details about conveyancer’s mistakes.
The changes are coming. Be ready.
2018 01 08
Antony Wilson
In our latest blog, Legal Studio reflect on lawyers, working conditions and chickens…

Is your lawyer happy?

There have been numerous reports popping up in the legal news recently regarding the unspoken issue of anxiety, depression and stress within the legal industry.

This is down to a number of factors, including:

•    The expectation of long working hours. Many lawyers feel that they have to stay in the office just to be seen by superiors, at the expense of their family or social life;

•    Additional responsibilities outside of the day job. There are always pressures and deadlines to be managed, but the additional management meetings, projects and constant need for existence justifying spreadsheets get in the way of meeting them without a last-minute panic;

•    Constant, ever-increasing, targets. These are often outside the individual’s control, but any failure to meet them is attributed to them; and

•    Lack of appreciation. Doing all of the above but receiving no thanks for any of it.

Free Range Lawyers: Good for Clients

Why should our clients care if we are happy? We are, after all, paid for the advice we give and documents we produce. Our happiness is of no concern to our clients…or is it?

Here at Legal Studio, a parallel has been made with battery hens. They both see little natural light, are often overworked and have had their freedom restricted. In short, just like the battery hens, many lawyers are unhappy.

There is a large backlash against battery hens in today’s food market, with consumers paying slightly more to know that their products have come from happy hens. This is where the parallels shift…by engaging a happy lawyer with more freedom, you are likely to pay less and the end quality of work is likely to be improved.

It is impossible to focus properly for hours on end, and everyone works better in different ways and at different times of day. When forced to sit at a desk from 7am until 7pm, a lawyer is not generating their best work and they are likely to be inefficient.

At Legal Studio, our lawyers all work freelance. Yes, we have an office. Yes, we are contactable between 9 – 5 Monday to Friday (and beyond). But no, we don’t sit at our desks trying to look busy or force our brains to complete a document when, in reality, we are struggling to focus any longer. There is a lot to be said for the ability to leave the desk to take a proper lunch, catch up with a contact, or go to the gym. Not only doesn’t it have a huge impact on our personal wellbeing, it also has a big impact on our ability to focus and reflect on our work.

Each of us has the ability to choose which cases we accept. It is not dictated to us. This means that the work we do is through choice, and our clients have a new level of importance to us. Of course, if we are busy we will work long hours, but this won’t be imposed upon us for no recognition.

So, the answer to the question of whether you should care if your lawyer is happy is yes. It will impact on your relationship with them, their work ethic, and their productivity. By being able to work efficiently, we are able to work cost-effectively.

Free-range lawyers – it’s a novel concept but it works on both sides. If you are interested in either joining us, or in finding out how we are able to assist you, please get in touch via our website.
2018 53 08
Phil Copley
As freelancers, it is essential that you understand your rights regarding Intellectual Property.  Ailsa Pemberton, provides a useful guide on the points you need to be aware of when commencing new projects.
For the purposes of this blog, I am focussing on the scenario where you are creating works for others. You may be: an artist commissioned to create a bespoke art work; a web designer creating a site for a customer; a photographer taking wedding photos; a journalist writing about an exclusive scoop; a computer programmer creating a new App for a client; and so on. In the majority of the scenarios above, you will be paid for your efforts and, with any luck, the happy client may recommend you, thereby leading to further work for you.
In the majority of the scenarios above, you will be paid for your efforts and, with any luck, the happy client may recommend you, thereby leading to further work for you.
As a specialist intellectual property (IP) lawyer, I advise clients how to maximise the value from their IP. For many of my clients this may take the form of advising on protecting their IP or drafting commercial agreements to get a return from that IP, e.g. by developing, using, licensing or selling, to name a few methods.
For freelancers, the value considerations need to start before the IP is created. Many freelancers undersell their works. Remember, the customer wants to tap into your expertise and are willing to pay for that expertise.
One of the most important factors is recognising the type of IP you are creating. Most of the examples above create copyright works, but you may also be creating a patentable invention, a protectable design or a registrable trade mark.
To focus on copyright: copyright arises automatically, without the need for registration in the UK, upon the creation of an original work. As creator, you are the first owner of that copyright work. Ownership of such work can only pass when you give your agreement in writing, even when being paid. So, if you are to transfer ownership as well as the work, make sure the price reflects that.
You might want to think about retaining some elements, licensing or transferring only part of the works, and retaining others. The retained parts can then be used by you in the future. You could grant rights for a limited time, or in a limited territory or for a limited use. Full ownership should always cost more.
Moral rights should always be considered. Unless you are producing white labelled goods for your customer, it is prudent to insist that your details are displayed on the works. This will show others who created the works and hopefully lead to more work for you.
Always keep full records, including dates, of the creation of your works. You need to be able to prove you are the owner should the work be stolen, for example if the customer doesn’t pay but uses your work anyway.
Some of the tips above arise from deep seated legal principles which I would be more than happy to explain further. Others are simply common sense. At the end of the day, however, a little knowledge is a good thing and will hopefully make your business more successful.
If you would like any further advice on IP issues please contact Ailsa Pemberton.
2018 51 08
Ailsa Pemberton
If you get 12 or more penalty points on your driving licence within a 3-year period, you get banned from driving
The length of your ban depends on the precise circumstances of your case, but you could be banned for:
  • no less than 6 months if you get 12 penalty points or more within 3 years
  • no less than 12 months if you get a 2nd disqualification within 3 years; or
  • no less than 2 years if you get a 3rd disqualification.
Also, if you’re disqualified for 56 days or more you must apply for a new licence and you may have to retake your test.
However, you may be able to argue that either a ban, or the length of any proposed ban would cause you “exceptional hardship”. 
An exceptional hardship must be something out the ordinary. Losing your job or your freedom to travel is not of itself enough.
However, in a recent case, Edmund Conybeare was able to successfully make an exceptional hardship application for a client who had already exceeded the 12-point threshold and prevented a ban being put in place at all. 
Finally, it’s worth knowing that if you’ve already had an exceptional circumstances argument accepted in the last 3 years you can’t rely on any of the reasons raised then to retain your licence for a second time.
It therefore pays to consult an expert early on to ensure you get the right advice and run the right arguments. 
Get in touch with Edmund to discuss your options today.
2018 47 08
Edmund Conybeare
Have you taken stock of how many invoices you have outstanding recently, and how old the invoices are?
Many businesses can have quite a shock at how much money they are owed in uncollected invoices but cannot commit the time to chasing them whilst meeting other business demands.
Credit Control systems can take time to put in place and monitor effectively, but without them, you may be allowing money owed to your business to simply disappear. Debt collectors are often ineffective as their letters are either ignored (as people realise that they rarely follow up with a court claim); or result in a breakdown of relationship with a client who may have provided further work.
If you feel that things are starting to spiral out of control in relation to your debt recovery procedures, why not speak to one of our experts at Legal Studio who will be happy to discuss any book debts with you and provide advice on credit control from a legal perspective going forward.
Please contact Aby Smith for further information at or 0113 357 3207.
2018 27 08
Aby Smith
Who owns your website?
Did you use IT design consultants to produce your website? You may have supplied all of the information or wording required, but the style, layout, imagery and often some of the content is created or supplied by the designer. 
So, who owns the intellectual property (IP) in the website? Is it you, the instructing – and most likely paying customer? Or is it the hard-working designer?
It may surprise you to learn that without a formal transfer of the IP, ownership remains with the designer.
IP law has, over the years, been developed to protect persons creating the work. So, in the eyes of the law, the first owner of the copyright in a commissioned website is the designer or their employer, if they are an employee. This remains the case even if the designer is paid for their services.
Most assume that on payment, ownership will automatically transfer. But this is not the case. The only way that ownership can move is if the designer transfers the copyright to the client in writing. This type of legal document is called an assignment. If ownership is not transferred the designer could, at some later date, object to certain uses of the work.
If you think you may have an issue, please contact Ailsa Pemberton at or 0113 357 3208.
2018 25 08
Ailsa Pemberton